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Let KTF facilitate your larger purchase of meat!

In addition to saving money by buying a side of meat instead of paying for your meat by the cut, you will also save thanks to KTF’s capped co-op fee. The co-op fee is capped on sides of meat as follows:

  • For sides costing $500-$999.99 the co-op fee is capped at $50
  • For sides costing $1,000-$1,499.99 the cap is $100
  • For sides costing $1,500-$1,999.99 the cap is $150
  • For sides costing $2,000-$2,499.99 the cap is $200

KTF also saves you time and money by providing a convenient, centrally located drop site, so you don’t have to drive out to the farm or butcher to pick up your meat. We can safely keep your meat for you in our below 40F cooler on the day of delivery (please note that this is not a freezer, so we cannot store frozen meat over night) enabling you to pick up at your convenience.

Some ranchers may also choose to offer home delivery to KTF members. Please inquire about this possibility ahead of time.

KTF accepts cash, check (must clear the bank before the meat is delivered), debit/credit cards, PayPal, Dwolla and EBT (food stamps)!

In early 2013, the Steering Committee decided that the first Board of Directors would consist of up to 12 Directors. Appx a year later, the time has come!

However, since there are fewer than 12 candidates for our first Board, the Steering Committee decided during the December and January meetings to elect all the nominees unless the Membership has any objections to any individual who is nominated. The Steering Committee is extending a 30 day period to bring forward any concerns or objection about any of our nominees.

Please direct any concerns to any member of the Steering Committee by email no later than noon on February 7, 2014.

PLEASE MEET OUR CANDIDATES:

Candice Aiston

I am a Brooklyn-neighborhood resident who has been shopping at Warehouse Café from its opening and was a Kickstarter contributor for the market. I am an attorney and small-business owner, and I hope to bring my skills in business planning and risk management to the steering committee and eventual board. I frequently spend time down in Umpqua Valley, Oregon, where my family owns a vineyard and farm. The family business has given me much insight into how difficult it is for small farmers to operate their businesses in ethical and sustainable ways and to reach consumers willing to pay for good products. I am  excited to be a part of something that helps both consumers and farmers to succeed.

I can be reached at candice (at) candiceaistonlaw dot com.

***

 

Rebecca Andersson

I founded Portland Green Parenting (PGP), a parenting support network with a focus on green parenting and sustainable living, shortly after moving to Portland in 2007 from southern California (although I am originally from Finland). Know Thy Food, our farm direct and bulk food buying club, quickly grew out of PGP in early 2008. In 2010, and with a lot of community support, I established Warehouse Café, which morphed into a café and market in November 2012 thanks to an immensely successful Kickstarter campaign. In 2013, a handful of other members and I set out working on transitioning the business into a community owned food co-op.

Strangely, I did not have any business, food service or restaurant background when I began this journey. Instead, I have a couple of degrees in Cultural Anthropology and an interest in community building and the intertwining of internet technology in people’s daily life. Luckily, my husband Dan Halli is a software developer who provides the technical assistance needed to create these websites. We live in an old 1913 Craftsman fixer upper in inner SE Portland with our four children. We also really like bacon. A lot.

I can be reached at rebecca (at) knowthyfood dot com.

***

JJ Ark

I am a father of two, married to Lynn Siprelle. We at one time owned several Internet cafes and I have a background in grocery management, although I am now a project manager for a telephone company.  I am interested in good food, bicycles, silliness, and I help run social media for Orycon, the local science fiction convention. I am colorblind, enjoy the music of Paul and Storm, JoCo, and Molly Lewis, and get out to the woods whenever I can. My goal is to create a Coop that will live on past the current membership and make sure that we have continued access to delicious food, with a focus on economic sustainability and local producers when possible.

I can be reached at jj (at) velvetackbar dot com.

***

Annie Bosworth-Foley

I have been a member, shopper and familiar face at the Warehouse since the early days of residence at the warehouse building.  I have two daughters, Teegan and Maeve, and I’m often seen at children’s shows.  I am a theatrical stage manager by trade and active on the Board of Cafe au Play as well as being the current Membership Coordinator of our future food co-op.  My husband David and I are both natives of the Southeast (US not Portland) and have lived in Portland for three and a half years.

I can be reached at anniebosworthfoley (at) gmail dot com.

***

Paul Munday

Brooklyn resident and father to a two year old, I moved Portland (and the US) a little under 5 years ago and I have been involved in the Steering Committee to set up the Co-op since its inception in 2012. I have a long history of involvement in the cooperative movement that stretches back over 20 years through my involvement in housing co-ops in the UK that provided low cost rental accommodation, both a member, and as someone who advised and aided others in setting up their own co-ops.

I am a firm believer in the principles of member ownership and democratic control exemplified by co-ops, as well as eating locally and living sustainably.  I believe that KTF can be a business that will be a living demonstration of these, and an asset to the communities it serves, the local, as well as the wider community of producers and consumers it brings together.

I can be reached at tallus (at) gmail dot com.

***

Crystal Peterson 

Hi! I’ve been a part of Warehouse Café since it opened its doors three years and three months ago in October 2010. As a parent of three amazing human being, it has always been one of my family’s values to support local and organic food. My experience at Warehouse Café has also helped me to grow in my understanding of the value in creating a community owned, cooperatively run grocery store. I am passionate about sharing in this journey with others.

I can be reached at crystal.peterson (at) pcc dot edu.

***

 

 

Dick Schubert

I am a 10 year resident of Portland along with my wife, daughter, and granddaughter. We have been KTF members for the last year or so. After a 30 year career in numerous scientific roles across the US we moved back west about 20 years ago. I have been a Board member of Northwest Youth Corps (Eugene), Beyond War (Portland), and the Johnson Creek Watershed Council (Portland).

I can be reached at sdschubert (at) comcast dot net.

***

 

 

Judi Yamada

When I retired from a career in juvenile justice, eight years ago, my husband and I moved to Portland.  Prior and since, my experience includes several years as a chef, food service supervisor, freelance food writer and cooking teacher. We currently own a Bed and Breakfast in Westmoreland. I’ve been a board member for Community Outreach, Inc. in Corvallis. And I was the Juvenile Department representative in the Benton County Classification and Compensation Committee. A member of Friends of Family Farmers, I’m passionate about eating fresh and buying local. We’ve been members of KTF for over a year.

I can be reached at lelesgal (at) aol dot com.

***

 

NOTICE – COOP FEE INCREASES TO 12% EFFECTIVE 01/31/14

The Protected Sick Time Ordinance approved by Portland City Council goes into effect on January 1st 2014. The Ordinance will allow all of our employees to earn up to 40 hours of paid sick time per year to use when they or a family member are ill or need preventative health care. The ordinance is intended to mitigate the spread of disease by allowing employees to care for themselves and family members, making Portland a healthier, more productive community.

The cost of providing up to 40 hours of paid time off per year to each employee will be up to 1/52 or 1.9% of total payroll expense.

Co-op Fee increase approved

In order for us to cover that added cost of doing business in our awesome city, the Steering Committee has voted to increase our 10% co-op fee to 12% as of January 31st 2014.

Thank you for continuing to support Know Thy Food and Warehouse Café & Market, and our efforts to provide a productive and healthy work environment!

We are quickly nearing 100 Member-Owners of our Co-op! This is our first goal and milestone, at which we plan to start the work of electing our first Board of Directors.

If you are interested in running for our Board and being a part of anchoring Know Thy Food in the community and continuing to serve our members with local, farm direct foods and bulk pantry staples for a long time into the future, please consider applying for a position.

Interested members should review the qualities and responsibilities of Board members and complete the application.

If you have any questions about serving on the Co-op board please contact rebecca@knowthyfood.com. We look forward to connecting with you!

In 2013, we will be transitioning from a private club (sole proprietor LLC) to a cooperative. We want to become a Community Owned Cooperative Grocery, owned by our consumer-members and our hard working staff-members. The new co-op will be one entity that will own Warehouse Cafe & Market and Know Thy Food (our online ordering service).

What does Member-Ownership mean?

Member-Ownership gives you:

  • part ownership of our co-op
  • a vote in elections and on important issues
  • the right to run for a position on our Board of Directors
  • an opportunity to participate in our Volunteer Program (coming soon!)
  • discounts in the market on Member-Owner Appreciation days
  • Member-Owner benefits, such as access to Know Thy Food and other pre-ordering of food
  • profit sharing in the form of Patronage Refunds
  • the satisfaction of knowing that you are helping anchor this well-loved business deeply in our community for a long time to come! This business will not leave the community without the consent of the Member-Owners!

How do I become a Member-Owner of the co-op?

Becoming a Member-Owner is quick and easy, and you only pay one time! The cost of Membership Equity is $150 + $25 admin fee per household. A household is defined as one primary member, his/her spouse or partner, and all their children under the age of 21 living with them. Limited income households receive a 50% discount and may pay $75 + $25 admin fee. Limited income is defined as households receiving EBT (food stamps), unemployment benefits, living below 120% of fderal poverty level, or living on a small, limited income such as Social Security. Download our Co-op Membership Form and mail it or bring it in to our location (address below) with your payment.

Why do Member-Owners pay Membership equity?

Membership equity is an investment into the business that makes you an owner. Like all businesses, co-ops need start-up capital. Co-ops capitalize by selling Membership equity (also known as shares). These shares are not considered income to the co-op and are therefore not taxable as income to the co-op. They are meant to be refundable should Member-Owners choose leave the co-op.

NOTE: Membership equity is always at risk and potentially not available for refund. We are planning for sufficient cash flow from operations and new memberships to support potential requests for refunds after the store has been open at least two years.

How is Membership Equity different than Know Thy Food’s annual membership fee?

Know Thy Food is currently a private club with an annual membership fee of $30. Revenue from these club membership fees is considered income and is taxable to the current LLC. These fees do not make members into owners. The fees are also not refundable to club members. While we transition in 2013, you may choose to become a Club Member or a Co-op Member-Owner.

Can I help the co-op formation by joining now or should I join later?

We encourage you to join the co-op today! In fact, we are waiving the $25 admin fee for anyone who joins before the end of January 2013! Once we have 100 members, we will be electing a 12-member Board of Directors and taking legal steps to incorporate as a cooperative. Until then, your membership investment will be held safely in escrow, and will be refunded if we are unable to complete the transition in a timely manner. Joining later is fine, too, of course, but you can really make a difference by joining now.

When will the transition be complete?

Our intention is to complete the transition by the end of 2013 with 1,000 Member-Owners.

What will change once the business is a co-op?

Our cafe and market will always be open to the public, but once we become a co-op by the end of 2013 it is our intention to make our online food buying service, Know Thy Food, a Member-Owners-only benefit that will be run by members, for members. This is so we can continue serving our members with the same, low pricing structure. All Club Memberships will expire at the end of 2013 and might not be renewable. We will only accept co-op memberships once we are a cooperative.

Can I still shop online at knowthyfood.com/shop in 2013 even if I do not become a Member-Owner right now?

Yes!
Until the transition is completed, you can join (or renew) as a Know Thy Food club member with payment of the club membership fee of $30. As explained above, this club membership fee is different from the Membership Equity investment and will expire at the end of 2013 once we have completed the transition to a co-op.

WE WARMLY INVITE YOU TO JOIN OUR CO-OP AS A FOUNDING MEMBER! HELP MAKE OUR MARKET A SUCCESS!

Please become a member by registering for access to our online product catalog and shopping.

We did it!

Thanks to 280 Kickstarter backers and countless other supporters and friends, we met and exceeded our $25,000 goal by almost $6,000 extra! Amazing! I am still in awe, so thankful and happy, and just a little bit in disbelief that this is really happening! We are going to have a market!!

To celebrate our success — and it really is our collective success — we are planning a soft opening and a celebration on Sunday, November 18th. The market will be open from 8 am to 8 pm, with the main festivities and activities from 2 – 6 pm.

Please stop by, say hi, enjoy some local food and drink, and get some holiday shopping done. Many of our wonderful vendors will be direct selling at the event; we will have samples and drinks; and we will unveil our new checkout stand made from local reclaimed lumber. Bring a friend. Meet a new friend. Enjoy our take on Happy Hour: “Buy a stranger a drink, enjoy yours for half off!” (good on all liquids we sell from 2-6 pm on the18th)

SAVE THE DATE! Hope to see you there!

 

 

I have been chomping at the bit all day, wanting to write (but holding babies instead) this “Hurray! We did it!” update and thank you all for your support, encouragement and for believing that this would and should happen. Thanks to all of you, together, we have reached our funding goal, and we’re going to have enough funds to pay for the basic infrastructure needed to open our awesome, new daily market!

Check out this screen shot of the graph Kickstarter generates. That last “bump” that put us over our goal came in really fast this morning. What a huge sigh of relief I breathed! I’m sure you all heard it echo all over Portland!

So….. we still have 6 days left. Let’s see how far we can stretch! What kinds of awesome things could we accomplish with more funds?

With extra funds, once the market is open, we could have weekly cooking demos or little workshops to help people learn new food preparation and preservation skills. I know we have so many skilled members in our community; how great would it be to develop a skill sharing program, and be able to offer the instructor an honorarium as thanks for sharing their skills with others!

Another idea I’d love to see materialize is outfitting our kitchen with an oven. So far our menu has been limited by the lack of an oven. Being able to bake our own cookies and pies, and adding healthy warm dishes like quiche and frittata to our menu would be so wonderful!

As always, I am interested in what YOU, our primary community, wants to see happen, so leave me comments! Typically, stretch goals help the entire community benefit from bringing in more pledges. Invite friends, get in on an add-on, or bump up your pledge, and we will be able to make the market experience better for everyone. Let’s make it really thrive!

ADD-ONS FOR ALL LEVELS

  •  I Love KTF organic t-shirt – Add $25 ($35 shipped in US)

ADD-ONS FOR LEVELS THAT INCLUDE A BAG

  • Extra bag refills – Add $25 for each refill

ADD-ONS FOR LEVELS THAT INCLUDE A KLEAN KANTEEN

  • 10 drink refills – Add $20
  • café cap – Add $5

Thank you again, truly, from the bottom of my heart!
This is all possible thanks to YOU!

It’s probably been a good 15-20 years since the last time I ate red or white meat (with the exception of a slice of bacon here and there), so I have to admit the idea of eating meat has been a bit weird. Regardless, I have come to believe that I need to include more protein in my diet, and the sound of Pemmican — a Native American “energy bar” of sorts — appealed to me.

Ingredients

Ground beef, buffalo or turkey (grass fed)
Berries (cranberries, blueberries, cherries etc)
Coconut oil
Honey (optional)

Preparation

1. Form the raw ground meat into meatballs, flatten as thin as possible and dehydrate at 115F degrees till bone dry.
2. Puree berries and spread out to a thin layer. Dehydrate till dry.
3. Using a blender or food processor, process dried meat and berries till they form a powder.
4. In a bowl, add melted coconut oil and honey till moist.
5. Transfer to muffin tins. Pack down well.
6. Refrigerate.

 

This post is part of GAPS Friendly Friday over at The Liberated Kitchen.